Collaboration with Boston University

Started since October, two students (Visal, Vuthy) and a facilitator (Cindy) from the Liger Leadership Academy received an opportunity from the director of International Labor Organization (ILO) in South-East Asia (Bodwell Charles) to create a wire-frame of an online business learning application for him to enter the app development competition. The opportunity was introduced two days before the competition dateline. This meant that my partner and I need to work our butts off for this project. 

The goal is to create an online learning app where it focuses on how to start a business and how to sustain your business. The lesson in the app is very entertaining– it has a dialog between two charactors that plan to create a business. The first lesson that we currently have on the app is “READY FOR BUSINESS: COMMUNITY-BASED ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT FOR BECOMING AN ENTREPRENEUR.”

After a while, the competition finally announced the winners, one of them is our app! By winning this competition Vuthy and I were able to collaborate with the Boston University’s students to further develop the application. So every Thursday we would have a video conference with the whole team updating what we have done. The application was implemented for Andriod operating systems only, and we used Andriod Studio as a text editor. Our roles in the application were to create the splash screen and the about page. 

Generally, we have experienced using the Andriod Studio to create an Andriod app, however, because of a lack of practice, we forgot some of the methods and objects. Due to this reason, Vuthy and I struggle a little bit to work on the application, but we still can do it. 

Working with university students help up to improve our ability in software development– we use Google Firebase as our database. Moreover, we also learn how to run a project successfully: how to manage each other’s role, how to run a video conference, and how to update our work to the team. We participated in this project because we know there are people out there who want to start the business and this is a really great resource for them. This app will change their life!

The cover of the book that we going to use.

 

Wire-frame that we created

   

 

Overall wire-frame

Actual app:

Correlation and Causation

On Chapter 3, we earned about correlation. In this chapter, I it was a bit difficult to catch up because there are so many calculation and keywords relate into this. It is a really fun topic to learn, and see the association between two variables. We did a small project where we survey Liger students and we compare those data to see are there a correlation. It turns out that height and weigh have a high correlation. 

Correlation (r) has a range from -1 to 1; when r = 1 or -1 means that two variable are really correlated but that does not means that one causing another. Correlation means that the two variable have an association; causation means that one causing another to happen, we can conclude that only if we do the experiment.

This an example of two unrelated variables, but they do have a high correlation. This doesn’t means that eating mozzarella cheese cause you to have a civil engineering doctorates awarded. Source: http://tylervigen.com/spurious-correlations

 

S’mores Lab

Part of our chemistry class, in term three, we learn about chemical reactions and determine bonds types. When we learned about determine bonds type, everyone in the class perceives the information quickly — because of our teacher! When it comes to chemical reaction and calculating excess reactant or limited reactant, most of us was froze. However our facilitator, Ellie, assigned us to do a lab where the product is s’mores.  From that lab we need to calculate the limited reactants and the excess reactant. For me, I learn each ingredient of s’mores and I can implement it into the actual chemical. I better understand of calculating chemical reaction better than just learning it theoretically.

Image result for s'mores
Picture of a s’more. Image from: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiNzKDy7ZLfAhUKMI8KHY0yDTsQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.foodnetwork.com%2Frecipes%2Ffood-network-kitchen%2Fperfect-smores-recipe-2105042&psig=AOvVaw1ABWb0mr41MYG4RLV1OuQ0&ust=1544448695322030

 


Lab Report

Problem:  Given a certain quantity of marshmallows, graham crackers, and chocolate pieces, what is the maximum number of S’mores that can be made?  Then figure out your percent yield!

Substance Symbol
Graham Cracker (half of a cracker) Gc
Marshmallow M
Chocolate Piece (individual piece of chocolate) Cp
S’more  (2 crackers, 2 pieces of chocolate, 2 marshmallow) Gc2MCp2

Procedure/data:

  1.  Use the 3 different reactants and one product to write a balanced equation for the making of s’mores

                            2Gc + 2M  + 2Cp → 1Gc2MCp2  

  1. What type of reaction would this be classified as? Both chemical and physical reaction
  2.  Record the total moles (pieces) of each reactant available at your table

Graham Cracker (Gc)-  6 Marshmallow (M)-  8       Chocolate Pieces (Cp)- 6

(amount of halfs of Gc) (each single marshmallow) (each single chocolate piece- 12 per bar)

  1. What is the maximum number of s’mores that your group can make?   3 s’mores

Why? The reason that we can make 3 s’mores because we got 6 mol Gc, 6 mol Cp, and 8 mol M, and for 6 mol of Cp we can only make 3 s’mores.

Which reactant/s is/are limiting?  (the one/s that you will run out of first) : Gc and Cp

Which reactant/s is/are  in excess (the one/s that will be left over) M

  1. Find the mass of one of each of the individual reactants (first zero a napkin and then find the mass on top of the napkin)

Graham Cracker (Gc)-  7.9 g Marshmallow (M)-  3.8 g Chocolate Piece (Cp)- 2.9 g

(one halfs of Gc) (one single marshmallow)           (one single chocolate piece)

  1. Record the theoretical yield/mass of a S’more (Gc2M2Cp2) using your reactants (you can add them together) = 29.2 g
  2. Make your s’mores
    a. Make sure that you follow the chemical reaction equation and get all of the reactants ready.
  3. roast your marshmallows over the Bunsen burner using a skewer. And then make your finished product.  
  4. Before eating your s’more find the actual mass (yield) of your s’more

(put a napkin on the scale, zero the scale and THEN put on your smore).

The ACTUAL (experimental) mass of one s’mores: 29.0 g

  1.  Find the percent yield of your s’mores: 29.0/29.2 * 100 = 99.32 %   Theoretical yield = from part 6 Actual or experiemental yield= from part 7c

percent yield= 99.32%

  1. How did you know which reactant was limiting?

Graham Cracker and Chocolate Piece are the limiting reactants. Based on the chemical equations, to create a s’mor  we need 2Gc, 2M, and 2Cp; we got only 6 Cp and 6 Gc and 8M. When we divide all reactant by 2 there’s no remaining for Gc and Cp, but remaining 2M. From the arithmetic, we can see that Gc and Cp runs out first — so they are the limiting reactant.

  1. How did you figure out the excess reactant?

We know that Marshmello is an excess reactant because we need only 6 (based on the common factor of the limit reactants) to create 3 s’mors, but the total marshmello is 8. This leave a remaining of 2 marshmallows. Also during the experiment, we followed the chemical reaction equation and turned out that there are two marshmallow left over.

  1. How did you figure out your theoretical yield for your product?

We weigh all of the reactants: Graham Cracker (Gc)-  7.9 g, Marshmallow (M)- 3.8 g, and Chocolate Piece (Cp)- 2.9 g. We take each reactant multiply by 2 (based on the equation) and sum it all up; we got a total of 29.2 g per s’mor.